Anatomy Of A Microscope

Introduction At its core, a typical microscope is essentially a box designed to hold two lenses in precise positions so that light can be accurately magnified from the...

Filters

Introduction The light microscope remains one of the most used tools for research, particularly in the fields of biological or biophysical sciences and offers a...

Resolution and Numerical Aperture

Introduction An often-asked question in imaging is whether two objects are in the same or separate places. Resolution, the ability to tell two nearby features...

Super Resolution Imaging – Learn

Super-Resolution Microscopy Super-resolution microscopy techniques are so-called because of their ability to resolve structures beyond the diffraction limit of light. Conventional light microscopy techniques are...

Camera Mounts

Introduction A microscope camera mount (also known as a lens mount) is an essential piece of hardware that interfaces between a scientific imaging camera and...

Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP)

Introduction Fluorescent markers become excited by specific wavelengths of light, and then emit light in a different wavelength. This makes them very valuable for scientific...

What Is Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy?

Introduction Typical fluorescence microscopy involves illuminating the entire sample and detecting the resulting fluorescence. Illuminating and detecting from the entire sample includes collection of out-of-focus...

Introduction To Light Sheet Microscopy

Introduction During the last two decades, microscopy has been constantly trying to exploit new boundaries. By aiming for smaller details, cameras and other detectors needed...

Fluorescence Imaging

Introduction Tissues, cells, and the smaller structures inside cells (organelles) are mostly water and are therefore transparent. Imaging tiny see-through bags of water results in...

Camera Sensitivity

Introduction The sensitivity of a camera is one of the most important aspects of camera performance – with inadequate sensitivity, your experiment may simply be...