Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) Microscopy

Introduction Fluorescence microscopy is a fundamental set of techniques in the life sciences for visualizing structures in living systems. Typically, a fluorescent molecule, either synthetic...

Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP)

Introduction Fluorescent markers become excited by specific wavelengths of light, and then emit light in a different wavelength. This makes them very valuable for scientific...

What Is Single Molecule Microscopy?

Introduction While most fluorescent microscopy involves looking at hundreds or thousands of fluorophores spread throughout a sample, it is sometimes necessary to observe specific molecules or small groups...

Köhler Illumination

Introduction In microscopy, we aim to produce a sharply-defined, magnified image of our sample in our detector or our eyes. The sample requires illumination for...

Super Resolution Imaging – Learn

Super-Resolution Microscopy Super-resolution microscopy techniques are so-called because of their ability to resolve structures beyond the diffraction limit of light. Conventional light microscopy techniques are...

Two-Photon Excitation

Introduction Two-photon microscopy is a technique that avoids the limitations of traditional fluorescence microscopy. Typical fluorescence microscopy involves using illumination of a specific wavelength in...

What Is Light Sheet Microscopy?

Introduction Conventional fluorescence microscopy involves flooding the whole sample with light and receiving emission light from the focal plane and also out-of-focus areas, resulting in...

Camera Mounts

Introduction A microscope camera mount (also known as a lens mount) is an essential piece of hardware that interfaces between a scientific imaging camera and...

Lattice Light Sheet Microscopy – Application Note

Introduction Light sheet is one of the fastest growing fields in microscopy due to the low cost, flexibility and fast 3D imaging of large samples....

What Is Widefield Imaging?

Introduction Any microscope technique where the entire sample is exposed to light is known as ‘widefield’ imaging. The counterpart to widefield is confocal, where pinholes...